Selling A Business Is Unlike Anything Else

The price of a business is determined by a valuation. The rules of a valuation come from the law and then legal cases as well as the Internal Revenue Code and custom. The price for most other items of value are determined by market comparables (for example, when valuing a house), looking up a book or some online site such as Kelly Blue Book (for cars) or results from eBay or some other online service (for any item you can think of). That is, there is no legal interference with the value of any these items except a business.

When advertising to find a buyer of these items, with the exception of a business there are no rules. To be clearer, when selling any other item the owner wants the world to know it’s for sale. Regular and established advertising channels are used including online web sites, newspaper or magazine advertising, family, friends and anything else to find a buyer. Conversely, with a business, advertising is done using less familiar methods and in most cases, the advertising is obscure so family, friends, customers, employees, suppliers, landlords, lenders and others are not aware the business is for sale.

When a buyer and a seller enter into negotiations for anything except the business, it’s generally very simplistic and does not need the involvement of third parties. In contrast, negotiating a business often involves complex negotiations with sophisticated parties. These parties can include lenders, landlords, attorneys, accountants, business intermediaries or business brokers as well as hidden support for buyers and sellers such as family and friends.

When selling a business, to get the maximum price possible, normally involves a lot of work for an extended period of time. The steps the seller takes includes trying to increase revenue, recasting the financial statements to arrive at an accurate and supportable discretionary earnings of the business and repairs and upgrades to make sure the business looks the best. Items being sold other than a business can similarly be polished but there is a limit on what can be done and the amount of time to do it.

When the buyer and seller reach an agreeable point in the negotiations of a business transaction, all items must be converted to paper. One of the first items it defines is whether the business is being sold as an asset or stock sale with this single decision has many tax and legal implications. Additionally, this one decision in itself, can set off a series of negotiations or at least, in-depth discussion and analysis by both parties.

In some business transactions, the negotiations can trigger a set of different valuations to support each parties position and whether or not the transaction ultimately closes. For example, if the purchase includes real estate or a large number of physical assets or intangibles such as trademarks or copyrights or the business itself then there could be four valuations. The first is a valuation of the commercial property, the second is a machinery and equipment appraisal, the third is an intellectual property appraisal and the fourth a business valuation.